Tag Archives: digital analytics fundamentals

Digital Analytics Fundamentals #5/1 – Reporting Overview

Unit 5/1 - Reporting Overview
Unit 5/1 – Reporting Overview

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles” which ended yesterday.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The first part of the fifth lesson provides an overview to the reporting interface of Google Analytics.

For each report you can adjust its date range, which will stay active till changed again or you log out. In addition you can add a second date range to compare current with historic data.

The granularity of the shown data can be changed to day, week, or month.

You can select the shown metric, and also select a second one for comparison.

To mark certain events e.g. for future reference, you can add annotations.

For tables you can choose primary and secondary dimensions as well as its metrics – which are organized into tabs at the top of each report.

You can use filters to display only specific values of the primary dimension or use advanced filters consisting of various rule sets.

You can visualize data in different ways using view options:

  • the data view as default option,
  • the percentage view with pie charts,
  • the performance view with bar graphs,
  • the comparison view to see which values are above or below averages,
  • and the pivot view with a pivot table with rows and columns showing different dimension values.

The plot-rows feature plots selected rows or segments of the table in the time graph.

Shortcuts remember specific settings to avoid tedious reconfigurations …

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #4/5 – Collecting Campaign Data

Unit 4/5 - Collecting Campaign Data
Unit 4/5 – Collecting Campaign Data

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The fifth part of the forth lesson addresses marketing campaigns.

Two user attributes – dimensions – Google captures are source – the referring website – and medium – the referral mechanism, how the user got to your site.

By default there are three mediums:

  • organic – identifies traffic coming from unpaid search results,
  • referral – traffic from other websites which are not search engines,
  • none – for users typing the URL directly or using a bookmark.

Via link tagging you can add extra information to links to track campaigns – the first three should be added for all manual tagging:

  • the Source and Medium tags allow to overwrite the default values described above,
  • with the Campaign tag you can name your marketing campaign,
  • the optional Term tag allows to identify keywords of paid search campaigns,
  • and the optional Content tag allows to specify different versions of your campaign.

 The URL builder helps to create those tags correctly.

Because Google AdWords and Google Analytics are connected, there is no need to create campaign tags manually for AdWords campaigns. The AdWords auto-tagging is enabled by default and adds also other dimensions specific to AdWords campaigns.

Channels allow to group traffic based on various link tags. There are predefined channels Direct, Email, Social, Organic and Display. It’s possible to redefine them and to create new ones.

Campaign information shows up

  • in the All Traffic report – including all sources and mediums from default values and tags,
  • in the Campaigns report – including data for each campaign used in tags and AdWords campaigns, but also information from the Content tag, which however will requires a change of the Primary Dimensions to Ad Content,
  • and in the Paid Search Keywords report – including tagged keywords.

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #4/4 – Setting Up Goals and Ecommerce

Unit 4/4 - Setting Up Goals and Ecommerce
Unit 4/4 – Setting Up Goals and Ecommerce

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The forth part of the forth lesson explains how to track macro and micro conversions using goals.

Macro conversions are primary business objectives. Micro conversions are activities necessary to reach the final macro conversions.

Goals are set up for specific views. Different views might/will have different goals.

There are goals that track user actions

  • web pages or views that are shown when the business objective is reached – like a “thank you” page – called destination goals,
  • goals that track starting a certain action – like downloading a file – called event goals,

and goals that measure user engagement

  • like a certain number of visited pages – a pages-per-visit goal,
  • or reaching a certain threshold spending time on a site – a duration goal.

Setting up the URI for a destination goal allows to use different match types – “begins with”, “equals”, or regular expressions.

The goal-verification tool allows to test goals during the setup process using a preview of the conversion rates for the last seven days.

Setting goal values allows to specify the monetary value for that goal to interpret its conversions as actual revenue.

Funnels are pages/actions leading to the goal. They show where a user enters or leaves the path to the goal. Multi-channel-funnels reports provide the path a user took to reach the conversion across multiple visits.

eCommerce reporting shows transactions, revenue, and many more commerce-centered metrics.

Where goals are counted only once per visit, eCommerce transactions are counted every time they occur.

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #4/3 – Setting up Basic Filters

Unit 4/3 - Setting up Basic Filters
Unit 4/3 – Setting up Basic Filters

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The third part of the forth lesson addresses filters to modify data within a view

  • to exclude data – e.g. filtering out traffic from your own IP addresses,
  • to include data,
  • to adjust the look of your data – e.g. adjusting URL names to lower case …

They are applied during data processing. The transformed results are shown in your reports.

Instructions/rules for a filter are called conditions. TRUE conditions are used for processing. FALSE conditions are ignored.

A filter needs to know

  • the type of data to use – e.g. IP address, device type, or geographic location,
  • the actual condition – e.g. the pattern it should match or not match,
  • and the action – what to do with the data.

Predefined filters provide templates for common situations. Custom filters can be used for almost any other unique situation.

Multiple filters can be applied and are processed consecutively.

All filters are stored in a filter library for reuse in the whole account.

Don’t forget to use new filters in the test view first!

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #4/2 – Understanding your Account Structure

Unit 4/2 - Understanding your Account Structure
Unit 4/2 – Understanding your Account Structure

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The second part of the forth lesson investigates the structure of an Google Anayltics account.

Google Anayltics accounts are a way to group digital assets. Certain configuration settings – like managing user access – apply for a whole account.

Within an account, properties collect data from unique tracking IDs. Typically you would separate distinct business using accounts, and different websites, mobile applications, or other assets belonging to that business using properties.

Nevertheless, you can still collect data from different websites using the same tracking ID, which is called roll-up reporting.

You can configure multiple views for a property to show different aspects of your data, e.g. to manage and protect your data.

At least three views are recommended:

  • an unfiltered view, which is generated by default,
  • a master view holding all settings to provide useful information,
  • a test view to play with your settings, before adjusting the master view.

Once data is processed, it can not be adjusted or reprocessed anymore … Creating a new view will only hold information starting with the creation of that very view.

It’s also strongly recommended to develop the measurement plan before setting up an account.

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #4/1 – Creating an Account

Unit 4/1 - Creating an Account
Unit 4/1 – Creating an Account

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The first part of the forth lesson creating a new Google-Analytics account.

During the first setup you will be asked whether you want to track a website or a mobile application. Depending on your choice different instructions will be displayed to add the correct code to your site or application.

For websites you will receive a piece of JavaScript which needs to be added to every page you want to track. It’s best to add it at the top of each page, just before the closing </head> tag. It can be added directly to the template you use.

For mobile applications you need to download the software development kit (SDK) which is available for Android and iOS.

Once the code is added to, real-time reports are generated immediately.

It’s also possible to use tag management instead or features of your software tools (e.g. Blogger, WordPress, Drupal) integrated directly or via plugins.

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Digital Analytics Fundamentals #3/2 – Key Detrics and Dimensions Defined

Unit 3/2 - Key Detrics and Dimensions Defined
Unit 3/2 – Key Detrics and Dimensions Defined

The Google Analytics Academy started a new course yesterday (March 11th 2014) called “Google Analytics Platform Principles“.  Though not required, it is recommended completing the “Digital Analytics Fundamentals” course on Analytics Academy before beginning this course:

The second part of the third lesson addresses the types of data used in Google Analytics – dimensions and metrics.

Dimensions are user characteristics like geographic location, traffic source, or the name of the viewed page.

Metrics are the counts how often those characteristics are seen on your page, their averages, or sums like the total purchase value associated with those dimensions.

  • Visitors or users measure the number of unique users visiting at a certain time. They can be segmented in new and returning users.
  • Visits or sessions measure a period of consecutive activity of the same user. The default timeout – till a new visit is counted from the same user – is 30 minutes. It can be changed depending on the site context (e.g. text based vs video site)
  • Pageviews count the number of times a page is viewed. Other interactions need to be triggered separately and need additional customization.
  • Visit duration is the time difference between the last and first interaction with the site.
  • Time on page is the time difference between two page views of the same page.
  • Bounce rate is the percentage of sessions with only one single page view.
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